‘First Day of School’ at New McCutcheon Legal Clinic

 

12162_lg

LAF celebrated the inauguration of its third community legal clinic last week at McCutcheon Elementary School in Uptown. Similar to its predecessors in Woodlawn and Wicker Park, the new McCutcheon Legal Clinic will be held throughout the school year on the first Wednesday evening of each month.  Its location in Uptown, one of Chicago’s most ethnically diverse neighborhoods, will provide opportunities to better serve non-English speakers in need of legal help, in a location they already frequent and know well.

There were already five clients by the time the clinic opened—two of whom were Spanish speakers. Volunteer attorneys paired with law students and posted up in the teachers’ lounge, the counselor’s office, and other available rooms where they met with clients. LAF attorneys built a makeshift “war room” where they were available to volunteers to provide expertise in their specific areas of public interest law as needed.

The catalyst behind the launch of the new clinic is private firm Baker McKenzie LLP, which has supported the McCutcheon school community for more than a decade by holding coat drives, helping with the debate team, and visiting classrooms to teach constitutional law. The firm was looking to get more involved in the school and the greater community, attorneys from Baker McKenzie explained. In partnership with LAF, they will staff the clinic each month and even take on some of its clients for full representation.

Advertisements

Take Two Lawyers and Call Me in the Morning

A child in public housing may be able to get treatment for her asthma, but her doctor can’t force her landlord to remove the black mold that’s causing it. Likewise, a lawyer can’t provide treatment for a senior living with cystic fibrosis, but she can fight to ensure his utilities stay on so he can keep his medications refrigerated. For people in poverty, legal issues can exacerbate health problems, and health issues can trigger legal problems.

To improve health outcomes and legal outcomes, both sides need to connect health care with patients’ broader social needs. To that end, health care providers and social service providers are teaming up to address the social determinants of health and poverty – such as income, housing, education, and employment, with Medical-legal partnerships. MLPs — the topic of LAF’s latest Brownbag Roundtable—are a prime example. In addition to helping patients and communities become healthier, MLPs reduce healthcare spending for high-need, high-use patients and improve reimbursement rates for clinical services, meaning that medical providers have more resources to help more people.

“As lawyers, we’re often frustrated that despite the best legal outcomes we can accomplish, our clients are still trapped in poverty because of chronic illness. Physicians and other medical providers we’ve talked to share that same frustration—that despite their best efforts, their patients are trapped in poor health because of factors beyond their control,” Trey Daly, Director of LAF’s Public Benefits Practice Group, explained at the Brownbag Roundtable last week. “MLPs bring together those two important roles in the lives of low-income Chicagoans, to find creative solutions that deal with both their legal and medical problems.”

The Health Justice Project, LAF’s flagship MLP, is a partnership between LAF, Erie Family Health Center, and Loyola University School of Law. “The providers at Erie understand social determinants of health, which makes them good at spotting legal issues, especially when a patient maybe didn’t even know their problem was a legal issue,” says Amelia Piazza, LAF’s MLP Project Coordinator. About half of the referrals come from doctors; while the rest come from a variety of other providers, including nurses, case managers, and behavioral health specialists. “We work to identify health-harming legal issues early, before they become critical. That way we can engage in preventative lawyering to help people stabilize their situation before they seek help through traditional means, after they’ve already lost their utilities or are facing eviction,” explains Alice Setrini, LAF’s MLP Supervisory Attorney.

Another perk of these partnerships is they enable LAF to reach populations that are harder to reach through traditional avenues. Of the clients that went through LAF’s regular intake process so far this year, only 7% speak Spanish as their preferred language—far less than the actual proportion of Spanish-speaking residents of Cook County. But since a large portion of Erie patients are Spanish speakers, more than 40% of patients they’ve referred this year speak Spanish as their preferred language.

LAF also hosts MLPs with Rush’s Road Home Program, a partnership with Rush’s Center for Veterans and their Families that aims to increase patient access to Veteran-specific public benefit, and partners with Howard Brown Health Clinic and Provident Hospital in efforts to bring legal aid to the traditionally underserved HIV/AIDS community on Chicago’s south side. LAF’s newest MLP, Health Forward/Salud Adelante, launched just this year. It’s an innovative partnership is with Cook County Health and Hospitals System and the Chicago Department of Public Health, and it started taking referrals in March.

Thanks to all who joined us for this informative presentation on MLPs at LAF, and how they are closing the health justice gap, one patient of a time.

May eNewsletter and LAF Awards

President Trump’s 2018 proposed budget, published last week, again proposes to defund the Legal Services Corporation, the source of 45% of LAF’s annual funding. While this would have a devastating impact on LAF, we’ve doubled down on proving how important LAF is by working harder than ever at making sure that people living in poverty have a fair shot at justice. And people seem to have noticed! Just this month, our own Dolores Cole and the Community Engagement Unit were surprised with a Program Champion award from the Rush Generations program, for their work educating older adults on their rights. Volunteer John Held received the Federal Bar Association and the District Court for the Northern District of Illinois’ Excellence in Pro Bono and Public Interest Service Award. And Executive Director Diana White was honored by the Rotary Club of Chicago among their outstanding Women of the Year.
You can read about these awards, and much more, in LAF’s May eNewsletter, out now.
On behalf of everyone at LAF, as well as our and clients and communities, thank you for your continued support. Your gifts of time and money are our most steadfast and reliable source of income and they ensure that LAF will remain strong even as political winds blow.

Home Away from Home: Inside Katten De Diego Legal Clinic

fileIt’s 4 PM, and the students at Jose De Diego Community Academy have gone home for the day. LAF staff and pro bono volunteers gather in a small cluster of rooms in the school’s basement, in what used to be the nurses office. On the third Wednesday of each month, this tight space serves as headquarters for the Katten De Diego Legal Clinic, a partnership between Katten Muchin Rosenman and LAF that provides free legal services to low-income residents of surrounding west Wicker Park (or east Humboldt Park, depending on who you ask).

But tonight is particularly special, as the clinic will be closing its doors for the summer months and reopening in September. The hearty team of volunteers from Katten include two new faces, but most are the usual suspects—like Alyse Sagalchik, an Associate at Katten and a winner of LAF’s 2017 volunteer of the year award. “It’s a unique opportunity to do what I see as a moral obligation as lawyers—to dedicate our time and resources to help people who otherwise wouldn’t have legal representation,” she says. “It’s doing good for other people, but I also feel good doing it.”

The thermostat reads 83° and with only eight chairs, the waiting room is full before the clinic officially opens at 4:30. Keith Forrest, Litigation Paralegal Supervisor at Katten and one of the volunteers who helped open the clinic in April 2013, assigns volunteers to each of the four small offices (formerly examination rooms) where they meet one-on-one with clients. “The volume of clients we’re seeing has gone up. But we’ve learned to be more efficient, and gotten better at knowing what questions to ask,” says Jonathan Baum, Katten’s Director of Pro Bono Services and long-time volunteer at the clinic. “It’s my home away from home—I love this place.”

In another small room just off the waiting room area, volunteers process intake forms and consult with each other on cases. “It’s neat to see attorneys from the private sector come out to do this kind of work—not because they have to, but because they want to,” says Dana Harbaugh, AmeriCorps VISTA Attorney in charge of coordinating LAF’s legal clinics. Jared Heck, a Partner at Katten who specializes in healthcare litigation and a longtime member of LAF’s Young Professionals Board, is a prime example. “You can actually see and feel the difference that you’re making,” he says.

By 7 PM, the flurry of activity has slowed and the group prepares to close up shop for the season. The steadfast team of volunteers saw 16 clients in total. Katten will be taking on a number of their cases pro bono, even as the clinic is dark over the summer. With Katten’s pro bono volunteers and financial support, LAF will continue to provide the families of the Jose De Diego Academy and their neighbors with legal solutions to their civil problems.

 

New ‘Ready to Work’ Initiative Breaks Down Legal Barriers to Employment

Chicago Workforce Center PilsenImagine you’re unemployed and get your driver’s license suspended due to parking tickets you can’t afford to pay—will you be able to find another job without a valid license?  What if your credit score tanked from a fraudulent car loan? How about if you were arrested back in high school, but don’t know how to get it expunged—will that prevent you from finding employment? For job seekers living in poverty, finding work is about more than just availability of jobs. “There are a number of legal issues that undermine people’s ability to support themselves and lead stable, productive lives,” says Miguel Keberlein, Director of LAF’s Immigrants and Workers’ Rights Practice Group. “It’s hard to tell people to pull themselves up by their bootstraps, if they don’t even have any boots.”

In partnership with National Able Network, LAF‘s Ready to Work (R2W) program is a newly funded initiative by the Lawyers Trust Fund of Illinois that helps remove legal barriers that keep people from getting and keeping a job, with the goal of helping them get back to work. LAF’s R2W team consists of attorneys, paralegals, and a social worker who connects clients with resources outside of LAF that may help them find further stability. “We’re trying to provide a holistic approach in how we serve our clients,” said Lilian Lepe, LAF’s lead paralegal for R2W.

LAF staff are stationed at the Chicago Workforce Center in Pilsen—home to National Able, Easter Seals and a number of other workforce development agencies—on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. To help caseworkers identify legal issues their clients may be facing, LAF developed a comprehensive screening tool and provided a number of trainings about the legal issues that lead to employment instability. As an established community workforce center that already offers a wide range of employment services, it’s the perfect home for R2W. “Creating job stability is a mosaic,” says Jonathan DeLozano, LAF’s lead attorney for R2W. “Legal aid is just one tile in that mosaic.”

Moving forward, LAF hopes to expand R2W by partnering with other workforce development agencies throughout Chicago. “By expanding the breadth of our work so we can reach more populations in more areas of the city, we hope to be able to reach as many people as we can,” Jonathan says.

Victims, Survivors, and April eNewsletter

Often, our clients need our help due to situations that arise outside their control and that are not their fault.  These people could be described as victims – of abuse, of oversight mistakes, of circumstance – but most of them prefer to be identified as survivors.  Some of them include Shelmun’s client Ellen, who was nearly evicted from her house because of a bank’s mistake; Kathryn’s client Betsy, who was almost not granted her nursing license because of records that should have been sealed; all of the CLASP program’s clients, who survive violence and abuse; and people subjected to systemic racism just because of where they live and the skimpy resources available to them.  Nonetheless, they continue to survive, and, with LAF’s help, to thrive.
You can read about these stories, and much more, in this month’s eNewsletter.  On behalf of everyone who does this work every day, and everyone who benefits from our services and your contributions, thank you.  Your continued support makes it possible for LAF to fight for the rights of victims and survivors and to ensure that they can see justice and fairness prevail, regardless of their circumstances.