Holistic help from medical-legal partnerships

Over the course of just a few months beginning last summer, Gary rapidly lost his vision to retinal detachment. At the age of sixty-one, he was without a source of income, unable to work, and as Kaitlyn Quigley, Gary’s attorney with LAF’s Public benefits practice group, notes, lacking some of the skills for living with vision loss.

Gary is insured by CountyCare, a Medicaid managed plan offered by Cook County Health and Hospital System, which collaborates with LAF as part of a medical-legal partnership (MLP). CountyCare care coordinators identify members facing potential legal issues, and then refer them to LAF for help. Gary came to LAF last fall seeking assistance with his application for Social Security disability benefits, after a referral from his care coordinator Camille Haynes.

To get approved for Social Security benefits, Gary needed to attend an evaluation at a doctor’s office, but he had no way to get there because his impairment kept him both from driving and from using public transit. So Kaitlyn, working alongside Camille and Jenelle Pedroza, LAF’s Client Services Coordinator, moved his appointment and helped him apply for paratransit accommodations so that he could make it to his appointment and get around on his own moving forward.

PACE busGary faced similar difficulty in applying for SNAP benefits after he missed a required phone interview because he couldn’t read the letter notifying him when the call was scheduled. His water was shut off because he couldn’t afford the bill while he had no income. Time and again, Jenelle, Kaitlyn, and Camille worked together to resolve issues as they arose and set Gary up for success in the future. They rescheduled his SNAP interview, advocated with the city to turn his water back on immediately, and helped him apply for a Salvation Army grant to pay down his water bill balance. They also connected Gary with resources at Chicago Lighthouse, an organization that specializes in helping visually impaired adults learn to live on their own.

This kind of assistance is what LAF’s medical-legal partnerships are all about. As Kaitlyn puts it, “there are aspects of your health that a doctor can’t fix. There are social determinants of health.” By working closely with Camille as Gary adjusted to living with a disability, LAF was able to help Gary resolve these issues, all of which could have adversely affected his health, as they arose.

LAF was also able to help when Gary was wrongfully billed over $1000 by an eye specialist that he was referred to by his doctor. At the time Gary received treatment, he believed that his care would be covered by Medicaid. Later, the specialist’s office informed him that they don’t accept the specific Medicaid plan that Gary is enrolled in, even though he showed an insurance card at the office that day, and even though, by law, a healthcare provider must verify a patient’s Medicaid coverage before providing treatment. Kaitlyn drafted a cease and desist letter to the specialist’s office, and they agreed to stop seeking payment from Gary.

“For him, this was important, because he isn’t judgment proof,” says Kaitlyn. Gary owns his home, an asset that could be put at risk by a court judgment for unpaid debt. Thanks to Kaitlyn’s early intervention, Gary’s home is safe from this would-be creditor.

But none of Kaitlyn or Jenelle’s work for Gary, on protecting him from wrongful billing for medical services or reinstating his utility service or securing him the benefits he is entitled to, would have been possible had it not been for our partnership with CCHHS. “Clients don’t always know that their problems are legal problems,” Kaitlyn says. “This is someone that never would have come to LAF if it wasn’t for his care coordinator.”

Gary’s case is just one example of how MLPs connect us with people that can use LAF’s help, but the kind of holistic service we were able to provide for him is exactly why those partnerships are so valuable to the communities we serve.

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